Tag Archives: Lost and the Damned

Lost and the Damned Tactica – Slaanesh Daemon Engines

Slaanesh

Slaanesh

 

Welcome back to the last post in this Lost and the Damned tactica series. I know it has taken ages (over a year!) to finally complete it but we are here now and I think we have covered everything.

 

Last up, but certainly not least, are the Slaaneshi Daemon Engines. Fast, lithe, and generally rather fragile, Slaaneshi units in EPIC mirror their 40k cousins. Oddly, Slaaneshi aligned units in EPIC do not have a clear bias towards either shooting or close combat, with each unit, although specialised towards one or the other, offering a broad god-aligned choice. This balancing is much more noticeable than with Khorne (close combat), Tzeentch (shooting), or even Nurgle, who is generally considered the other all-rounder god.

Slaanesh has three aligned units in the Lost and the Damned list – the smaller Daemon Knights and the two larger, warhound titan sized, Questor and Subjugator titans.

Helscourge Daemon Knights

Helscourge Daemon Knights

Daemon Knights: Daemon Knights are a fast, shooty, armoured walker which gives the Lost and the Damned army some much needed speed and quality firepower. Moving 30cm, with a 4+ armour save, and a 4+ firefight score makes them excellent for initiating supporting fire and engagements, especially in combination with their Invulnerable Save special rule. In addition to this, each Knight is armed with a Castigator Cannon (45cm, 3x AP3+/AT5+) which gives them some serious firepower – being longer range than most of the rest of the Lost and the Damned army and being of a higher quality. Given that they come in a formation of four for 275pts, twelve AP3+ shots is a very good output and can be especially nasty if their speed is used to claim cross-fire. All of this is topped off with two very important special rules – Fearless and Scout. Being Fearless means that the Knights are likely to stick around for alot longer than otherwise, and that they can use any withdrawal moves to set up advantageous rally positions. Scout helps to screen some of the bigger, more unwieldy LatD formations, while also meaning these things can garrison in deployment. This puts them right up in the face of the enemy, which is good because it allows them to play a part in the battle almost instantly, but can see them attracting ALOT of firepower early on, so try and use cover (walker remember!) to keep them hidden.

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Titans: Just a quick look at the stats both share before moving onto their particularities. Both titans are warhound equivalents, being 3 DC war engines with 2 void shields. Both move 35cm and both have a 5+ Reinforced Armour save. Both have the special rules Fearless and Walker. They both come in a freely mixed formation of 1 – 2 at 225pts for a Subjugator and 275pts for a Questor. All of this makes them broadly analogous to loyalist warhounds, and they fulfil the same kind of role in the list as warhounds do in Imperial lists. Their speed and resilience make them stand out, as does the fact they are the only things in the whole list which have Void Shields.

Questor

Questor

Questor: The Questor takes the warhound chassis and gears it towards shooting. Sporting two Castigator cannons (45cm, 3x AP3+/AT5+) and two battlecannons (75cm AP4+/AT4+), the Questor boasts quite  abit of good quality firepower at a decent range. This makes it somethign of a standout in the context of the list, and when placed on a speedy platform eight shots can proves pretty fearsome. Still at 275pts, it is the more expensive of the pair, and when compared to the Daemon Knights above, lacks comparable firepower. The slightly longer range and slight resilience boost offsets this to some degree, but in terms of raw firepower, I feel it is a little lacking. However, with a 3+ FF and two Void Shields, the Questor can be a very efficient engagement enabler allowing for bigger formations to provide supporting fire.

Subjugator

Subjugator

Subjugator: The Subjugator takes the opposite direction, gearing itself almost entirely for close combat. Although it does mount a single battle cannon (75cm AP4+/AT4+), the real weapons are the pair of Hellblades it carries. Each provides two extra attacks in close combat which are TK(D3), meaning that each titan is attacking with 4 TK(D3) and 3 regular attacks all of which hit on a 3+. On a lucky day that means that a single Subjugator could eat an Emperor titan – certainly something to be scared of for only 225pts! However, the major downside of the Subjugator is that it appears in an army with a strategy rating of only 2. This means it is highly likely that the Subjugator will be destroyed before being able to engage its target. Although this can be offset by having lots of them, or having lots of bubble-wrapping formations for them, the Subjugator seems to me to be much more worthwhile in lists like the Emperors Children (strategy rating 4) where at 250pts each they seem an absolute bargain.

 

That brings us to the end of the Lost and the Damned Tactica. Please give me a shout / comment if there is anything you still want me to talk about / have not covered, or let me know which army you would like to see done in the future!

 

Thanks guys

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Tzeentch Daemon Engines

Tzeentch!

Tzeentch!

 

Hi guys,

Welcome back to the most recent post in the Lost and the Damned tactica series I am doing here. Yes, I know it has been a long time, but we are almost at the end now. Tzeentch in EPIC is the daemon that deals mostly with firepower, whether in the form of actual shooting or good firefight scores – often with the bonus of decent AT scores and / or Ignore Cover. This makes them particularly useful in the Lost and the Damned which tends to lack in decent quality firepower – see my previous article here on Daemons for more of an explanation.

Tzeentch Sorceror

Tzeentch Sorceror

Tzeentch Daemon engines are particularly unique because they are the only one that are flyers – either proper flyers or skimmers. Both the Doomwing and the Firelord are flyers, adding to the LatD Thunderbolts and Marauders covered here, while the Silver Towers are skimmers which mount long-range anti-tank firepower.

Doomwing

Doomwing

Doomwings: Doomwings come in formations of three at 150pts, with each Doomwing being a 6+ Armour Save (and Invulnerable Save) fighter armed with a Flame Cannon – an AP4+/AT5+/AA5+, Ignore Cover, Fixed Forward weapon. This makes them surprisingly good at anti-infantry work, with the AP4+ and the Ignore Cover syncing up well to target infantry formations hiding in cover. The AT5+ is decent, but nothing special, and I not quite sure how a flame-thrower works as an AA weapon.

The main let down for the Doomwing is the 15cm range on the weapon – this means that in order to shoot it has to get exceptionally close to the target. This means that the Doomwings will be exceptionally vulnerable to both active and passive AA, which, given they only have a 6+/6+ save, makes them very fragile.

Firelord: The Firelord is the bomber version of the Doomwing, being a 4+ save, Bomber type. It comes as a formation of 1 to 3, at 150pts each. This makes them pretty flexible. Each Firelord is armed with a Flame Cannon (15cm AP4+/AT5+/AA5+, Ignore Cover, FxF), Firestorm Bombs (15cm D3BP, Ignore Cover, FxF), and a Twin Lascannon (45cm AT4+/AA4+, FxF). This makes them pretty good as an anti-infantry bomber – throwing out between 1-3 BP plus the AP4+ from the Flame Cannon. The Lascannon does not really turn it into a viable AT attacker, but it does provide a little long range AA into the mix. Being able to change the formation size is a real bonus – pick one to fill in 150 spare points, or go balls-to-the-wall with a 450pt formation of three. That is 3D3 BP (average of 6) plus three Ap4+ Ignore cover shots, plus the three lascannons!

Silver Towers

Silver Towers

Silver Towers: Silver Towers are the only non-flyer Tzeentch Daemon engine – a 20cm skimmer, with a 4+ Armour Save, 6+ close combat, and 4+ firefight. They come in a formation of four and are armed with two weapons – Arcane Cannons (45cm 3x AP4+/AT4+) and  aBeam of Power (60cm MW5+). These are significantly different to any other firepower available to the Lost and the Damned list – long ranged, reliable, Macro Weapon. A full formation of four can kick out a huge amount of firepower, but they remain very fragile – best kept back, preferably behind cover, using Skimmer to pop up and fire.

Fly my birdies!

Fly my birdies!

 

In the context of the wider list, the Tzeentch Daemon Engines as a whole do not really fill a role that cannot be adequately filled elsewhere – Doomwings are generally worse than their Thunderbolt equivalents for the things I want my aircraft to do, while I feel Firelords lose out to the possibilities offered by artillery of the more conventional kind, even though they do have Ignore Cover on their bombs. Silver Towers I think offer the greatest benefit tot he Lost and the Damned army as they provide some decently fast, hard hitting firepower that can threaten armoured vehicles effectively from far enough away to remain safe.

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I am not dead…

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Hi guys,

Apologies for the posting slow down, I have been pretty ill recently and work has been piling up massively as I come towards the end of my PhD. I am back home for the summer now, so expect blogging to pick up a little, with the Lost and the Damned tactica needing to be finished off and complete army pictures of my EPIC Imperial Guard to come.

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Nurgle Daemon Engines

Nurgle

Nurgle

Hi guys,

The next post in this ongoing series is for the Nurgle Daemon Engines in the Lost and the Damned list – the Plague Tower and the Contagion Engines. Nurgle in EPIC continues the same kind of game themes seen in 40k – resilience, decent FF and CC capabilities, slow speed – but also adds in a flavour of cover ignoring barrages and anti-infantry firepower to expand Nurgle’s role a little bit.

Sweet 40k Plague Tower

Sweet 40k Plague Tower

The Lost and the Damned list has two options for Nurgle Daemon Engines – either the artillery type Contagion Engines or the larger Plague Tower war engine. Unlike the Lord of Battles / Lord of Skulls, neither of these have made their way over to mainstream 40k, although there have been a number of very cool Plague Tower conversions.

Contagion Engines

Contagion Engines

Contagion Engines: Contagion Engines are big catapults that throw gobs of nurgle-y stuff at the enemy – pretty straight forward! Stat-wise, the Engines are a formation of four for 325pts (the same price as a Basilisk formation, discussed here) and are an armoured vehicle with 15cm move, 5+ Armour, 5+ CC, and 5+ FF. This makes them slightly slower than the comparable Basilisks, but with a better CC score. Both pretty much irrelevant stats when it comes to artillery pieces! Weapon-wise, the Contagion has an indirect firing 45cm 1BP weapon with Disrupt, and a 30cm AP4+/AT6+ weapon with Disrupt. This means that the formation can throw out two templates with Disrupt to a range of 90cm, along with some token short range firepower, making the additional blast markers give by Disrupt a trade off for the Basilisks increased range.

Plague Tower

Plague Tower

Plague Tower: Next up is the Plague Tower, a filth-filled monstrosity that unleashes barrages of slime across the battlefield while transporting the followers of Nurgle. Being a DC6 war engine, the Plague Tower is the equal biggest thing in the Lost and the Damned with the Lord of Battles, and with its 4+ Reinforced Armour save and Invulnerable Save it is equally resilient – although like the Lord of Battles it also lacks any kind of Void shielding, making it more susceptible to anti-titan weaponry than comparable war engines from other armies. Coming in a formation of 1-3 Plague Towers at 325pts each, they are not cheap (a formation of three being a whopping 975pts!) but each individual Tower is roughly equivalent to either the Contagion Engine formation, or the Traitor Artillery Battery formation. They also fill kind of the same role as these two other formations, with one interesting tactical addition, with their armament being broadly in the same category – a 60cm 3+D3BP Disrupt Plague Mortar (note no Indirect Fire, which seems strange for a mortar…), two 75cm AP/AT 4+ Battlecannons, and one 90cm AP3+/AT5+ Ignore Cover Rot Cannon. This gives them comparable to better levels of firepower to the two alternative formations (3+D3BP vs. 4BP, plus all the long range secondary weapons), while also being much more resilient and approaching decent in FF and CC.

One of my favourite Nurgle pictures

One of my favourite Nurgle pictures

The other interesting aspect of the Plague Tower is that each one has a transport capacity of 16 stands – meaning, as it is a war engine, that it can transport units outside of its formation. This means that you can easily load up each Plague Tower with a Cultist Coven, keeping them safe behind the 4+ Reinforced Armour save. However, while this might give you the idea of using them like heretic Gorgons, the 15cm move of the Plague Tower gives them no extra mobility over being on foot. For this reason, I think the best use of a Plague Tower is probably as a replacement for either a Contagion Engine or Traitor Artillery formation. While the range on their barrage may be shorter, it is on a far more reliable platform and produces more firepower than either of the alternatives.

Another Realm of Chaos cut-out

Another Realm of Chaos cut-out

In the context of the wider list, I just don’t see a place for the Contagion Engine as it seems to be outclassed by the Basilisk on range, and by the Plague Tower on firepower and survivability. While Disrupt is undoubtedly nice, I am not sure it makes up for the shorter range and relative fragility of the formation. The Plague Tower, however, seems to me to be a good alternative to an Artillery or Contagion Engine formation and seems to have two or three worthwhile roles. The first is as a straight forward artillery piece – 3+D3BP is more barrage firepower than either of the alternative for the same price, without including any of the shots from the Battlecannons and Rot Cannon. 60cm range might be a bit painful, but the second use of plonking a cheap Cultist Coven in it and moving it up in the first turn onto an objective to sit their protecting it makes this less of an issue. Thirdly, perhaps in combination with some faster mechanised covens, the Plague Tower could be used to grind forward transporting a CC orientated Coven (an additional 3 Big Mutants, or 2 Big Mutants and a Daemon Prince), to put pressure on the opponent and unload the Coven in an assault. Still the 15cm move of the Tower makes this tricky to make work, and I think either of the other two options is probably a better bet.

Next up Tzeentch Daemon Engines!

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Khorne Daemon Engines

Blood for the Blood God!

Blood for the Blood God!

Hi guys,

Back again with the next installment of the ongoing Lost and the Damned Tactica, this time it is the turn of the Daemon Engines of Khorne. I know it has been a while since the last post of this series dealing with Air Support, but job hunting and thesis writing have been keeping me busy and sadly away from gaming. I should be moving down to London with my boyfriend toward the end of this summer, so hopefully gaming (and employment!) will pick up then.

Known throughout the 40k universe as bloodthirsty and obsessed with close combat, EPIC allows more of the nuances of Khorne to come out in the form of long-range and technologically superior war machines all designed to cause massive amounts of blood and carnage.While close combat is undoubtedly a significant part of the flavour of Khorne, any bloodshed, whether caused by a chain-axe or a mortar feeds Khornes appetite for death and destruction.

The Lost and the Damned list has two available formations dedicated to Khorne – the Lord of Battles  and Daemonic Assault Engines. The Hellfire Cannons are also often thought of as Khornate (stemming as they do from the old Cannons of Khorne and Doomblaster models) but they appear in the list as undivided and that is how they appear here. A word of warning before starting though – my Lost and the Damned army is themed as a Traitor Guard force, so makes little use of the more established Daemon Engines, and therefore I don’t have as much experience using them as I do with the guard elements of the list. Bear with me, and sling a comment my way if I miss something!

Lord of Battles

Lord of Battles

Lord of Battle: The Lord of Battles (recently kind of  re-envisioned in 40k as the Lord of Skulls) is a large, titan-sized war engine armed with a mix of close-combat and medium range weaponry. In EPIC it is a DC6 war engine with a 4+ Reinforced Armour save meaning it is one of the biggest things available to the Lost and the Damned, and is the equivalent in size to a Reaver Titan. Armament wise it wields a +3 Extra Attack Macro close combat weapon, 4 AT/AP 4+ shots at 45cm, and 2 AP/AT 4+ shots at 75cm, giving it a decent amount of firepower in the medium range band and 9 attacks in CC (6 DC + 3 Macro) all of which will hit on a 2+. Overall this is pretty respectable for 400pts (250pts cheaper than a Reaver, only 150pts more than a Warhound), but there are a couple of things that bring the Lord of Battles back down for me. The first is the lack of Void Shielding – something de rigeur war machines in other armies but completely unavailable to the LatD – which hampers the survivability of these war machines. While a Shadowsword is likely to have to fire once at a Warhound Titan before it even scratches the paint thanks to its two Void shields, with the Lord of Battle that first shot is likely to blow a pretty big chunk out of it. While the 4+ Reinforced armour save makes it resilient against normal firepower, any dedicated anti-titan weaponry (Shadowswords, Deathstrikes, Cobras, Scorpians etc) are likely to make pretty short work of it long before it reaches combat. Something making this problem worse is the lack of other good targets for this kind of firepower to fire at in a normal Lost and the Damned army – few other war machines or high-value targets – meaning that all of that type of firepower can be directed at the Lord of Battles, while the lack of reliable alpha-striking formations on the Lost and the Damned side make taking these kind of formations out before the fire unlikely.

Combined with its speed of 25cm, and the ubiquity of anti-Titan weaponry in decent sized games of EPIC, I just see the Lord of Battles as being somewhat sub-par in the context of the Lost and the Damned list – although very effective at certain particular roles, I feel it will struggle to reliably get into combat before being shot up, and at 400pts (or 800 if you take a formation of two!) it is likely to be the BTS.

Khorne Daemon Engines

Khorne Daemon Engines

Daemon Assault Engines: These Assault Engines are essentially the little brothers of the Lord of Battles, being 25cm Speed, 4+ Reinforced Armour vehicles, with D3+1 close combat attacks hitting on 3’s, and two AP 4+ / AT 5+ 30cm shots each. They come in a pack of 4 for 300pts. So a fairly close combat centric vehicle with some token shooting and a good armour save (RA and an Invulnerable Save), they are just as fast as their big brother with the added benefit of being easier to hide, but lose out on resilience (4 vs. 6 DC) and macro attacks for a 100pt price drop. These stats mean they will be great at driving into hordes of lightly armoured troops and mincing them, but will struggle against more heavily armoured foes, while the armour save should keep them safe from incoming fire on the way in. Overall I quite like the look of the Daemon Assault Engines, but the comparison between them and Defilers with their Infiltrator and MW attacks is a close one.

Skulls!

Skulls!

In the context of a list both formations really dictate the way in which list can be built – both, I feel, need a saturation of targets to make them worthwhile and shore up their weaknesses.

With the Daemon Assault Engines, I would be tempted in 3000pts to try and take as many formations as possible to overwhelm the opponent and make up for the lousy strategy rating of the Lost and the Damned. Combined with a load of mechanised Cultist Covens with Daemon support it would rely on fast movement and giant assaults to throw the enemy off balance. Something like:

Coven (Khorne) w/ DPact, Demagogue, Land Transporters x 4

Coven (Khorne) w/ 3 Griffons

Khorne Assault Engines x 4

Thunderbolt flight

Daemon Pool w/ 7 Lesser, 1 Greater

Throw the eight main formations up in the first turn, using cover and praying that the enemy panics and shoots at the wrong things. Then in the second turn summon daemons (Bloodthirster to take on enemy hard targets if possible, otherwise Flesh Hounds) and launch assault after assault – even if some do not go well, you should have enough pressure on the enemy to break any kind of plan they have. Use the Griffon formation as cheap backfield artillery / Blitz guard to try and make the opponent spread out, while the Thunderbolts intercept to try and keep things like Nightwings from having a field day on your Assault Engines. Maybe not a terribly competitive list (it would struggle against air-assaults, lacks scouts, and would struggle against something like a Reaver or Warlord) but I imagine it would be very fun to play!

Of course the four formations of Assault engines could be replaced by three separate Lords of Battle – providing a pretty solid core to the army, but running into BTS issues (maybe one formation of 2 and one formation of 1 would be better), but not really presenting the same tidal wave of second turn pressure.

Cauldron of Blood - one of the Assault Engines

Cauldron of Blood – one of the Assault Engines

That is pretty much it for the vaunted Daemon Engines of Khorne – some good, but not stellar, options that require alot of thought / list building around them to get the best out of them. Still they give players a great opportunity to make up some really crazy and aggressive Lost and the Damned lists, and to rack up skulls for the skull throne!

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Air Support

Pretty cool Thunderbolt diorama

Pretty cool Thunderbolt diorama

Hi guys,

Back to the ongoing Lost and the Damned Tactica with this post, this time looking at the Air Support formations available to the list and the role that they can play in armies. As a quick note, I will be covering the Doomwings and Firelord Daemon Engines in an upcoming Daemon Engines post even though they are flyers, but the Daemon Engines post may be a while coming – there is alot to talk about!

So, the Lost and the Damned list has the choice of two air formations, both ripped straight from the Steel Legion Imperial Guard list and probably very familiar to any Space Marine players too. The two formations, Traitor Thunderbolt Fighter-Bombers and Traitor Marauder Bombers, both have very different functions.

A 40k sized Thunderbolt I have recently bought.

A 40k sized Thunderbolt I have recently bought.

Traitor Thunderbolt Fighter-Bombers:Thunderbolts come in a formation of 2 for 150pts and have a 6+ armour save. Armament wise they sport a decent selection of AA, AP, and AT firepower all fixed forward in arc:

Stormbolters 15cm AP4+/AA5+, FxF
Multilaser 30cm AP5+/AT6+/AA5+, FxF
Underwing Rockets 30cm AT4+, FxF

The ubiquity of Thunderbolt formations in Lost and the Damned lists is both a testament to their usefulness in the context of the list as a whole, and the genesis of the recurring joke that the first thing a planetary governor faced by a revolt should do is lock up all the pilots (and Sentinel drivers…). The reason for this ubiquity is the way in which Thunderbolt formations provide the list with the ability to reach out and touch the enemy at long range, with good AT firepower which is a weakness of the list, and also provide good Intercept and AA coverage, which as we have seen is another weakness of the list. So the Thunderbolts, for a relatively cheap cost, provide the LatD player with the ability to effectively shore up the structural weaknesses of the army to a certain degree.

What tends to happen to Marauders whenever I try to run them...

What tends to happen to Marauders whenever I try to run them…

Traitor Marauder Bombers: Marauders, like their Imperial cousins, come in a formation of two for 250pts and have a 4+ armour save. Armament wise they are focused mostly on a bombing role, with a little bit of long range AT too:

2x Twin Heavy Bolter 15cm AA5+
Bombers Bomb Racks 15cm 3BP, FxF
Twin Lascannon 45cm AT4+/AA4+, FxF

I have to admit, I have never been able to get Marauders to work effectively for me either in the Lost and the Damned or in any of the Imperial lists that use them. They are very fragile, and even though they put out 6BP as a formation, I have found ground artillery to generally be a better investment, because as soon as one Marauder is downed the usefulness of the formation drops significantly. In the context of the Lost and the Damned list, they compete against Basilisks in the Traitor Artillery Battery formation, and against Griffons embedded in Cultist Covens.

One thing to note about the Lost and the Damned list is that its access to air formations is slightly different. While normally War Engine and Air Support are limited to 1/3 or 1/4 of the total army points, in the Lost and the Damned list they are included in the 1 Coven : 1 Support formation ratio – meaning that you can take one air formation for every Cultist Coven. Realistically I don’t think this is every likely to make much difference (I tend to take 2 formations of Thunderbolts in most lists, one for attacks, one to help with AA / Intercept), but it does raise the amusing possibility of a 3k list with 8 barebones Covens and 8 formations of Thunderbolts!

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Looking forward to 2014…

Having gotten the reminiscing out of the way, here is what I plan to get done over the next year:

IMAG1322

EPIC IG

Blog wise

Finish the EPIC Eldar army pics – 1 more post to go

Do EPIC Imperial Guard army pics

Finish the Lost and the Damned Tactica series – Daemon Engines and Air Support still to go

Get full Army / Fleet pics up for those that do not have them

Do more Daemon World playtesting / battle reports

 

Time to get painting!

Time to get painting!

Painting wise

Finish painting my EPIC Dark Angels

Finish painting my Necromunda gangs – Delaque, Pit Slaves, Escher, Redemptionist figures

Paint a 40k Army – probably Steel Legion

Finish off my Rogue Trader fleet – its composition has changed significantly since the last time it featured here

Paint up the remaining BFG models to match their fleets – Ork capital ships, Imperial light cruisers etc

Paint BFG Maelstrom and Bastion Fleets

 

The original Mighty Empires

The original Mighty Empires

Hobby wise

Convert a 1,000pt-ish Dark Eldar and Tyranid fleet for BFG from 40k bits

Organise all the Inquisition models I have into a coherent force

Work out how the original WHFB Mighty Empires works

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Daemons

Khorne, Nurgle, Slaanesh, and Tzeentch

Khorne, Nurgle, Slaanesh, and Tzeentch

Hi guys,

Welcome to the next post in my ongoing Lost and the Damned tactica series (available here), which deals with the various Daemons available to the army. In this post I will be quickly looking at the various Lesser and Greater Daemons available, before then looking at how they interact with the army as a whole. Daemons are quite an important part of the Lost and the Damned list, being the main thing that sets them apart from a poor-mans Imperial Guard army, and offer the chance to seriously ramp up the combat or firefight potential of your formations through the Summoning mechanic (discussed here). The great thing about Daemons is that they can be summoned anywhere on the board where you have a Daemonic Pact upgrade, making them excellent for filling gaps in your battle plan or shoring up weak point.

 

So, Lesser Daemons:

Bloodletters:

Bloodletters

Bloodletters

Bloodletters are a great close combat stand, having two 4+ CC attacks and the save armour save as a Space Marine (4+). While this might make them seem like the go to Daemon stand, they are hampered by their 15cm move and complete lack of a firefight value. This leaves them vulnerable to not getting into combat with the enemy, or being caught in firefight as the enemy avoids them. They also lack any kind of special rules or special attacks, meaning that although they are excellent against lightly armoured targets, they will struggle against anything with Reinforced armour saves.

Daemonettes:

Daemonettes

Daemonettes

Daemonettes are another broadly CC centric Daemon stand, however in contrast to the Bloodletter, the have a single 3+ CC attack with the special rule First Strike (In EPIC attacks are worked out at the same time, so all unti get to fight even if they die in the engagement – first strike attacks are worked out before this, allowing the formation to reduce incoming attacks by killing the enemy off before they get the chance to strike. Daemonettes also have a 15cm move, a 4+ armour save, and no firefight, leaving them open to the same problems as the Bloodletters. However, their First Strike does give them and a little more protection than their Khornate competitors.

Plaguebearers:

Plaguebearers

Plaguebearers

Plaguebearers break the routine of the previous aggressive CC daemon stands by being mostly a defensive stand. They have the same 15cm move, but have a 3+ armour save, 4+ close combat, and a 6+ firefight value. This makes them decent (for the Lost and the Damned!) in firefight, and very difficult to kill especially when combined with their Invulnerable Save special rule.

Flamers:

Flamers

Flamers

Flamers are probably the only daemon stand that is geared towards firefight rather than close combat. Their stats drive them this way quite significantly with two 4+ firefight attacks each, while only have a single 5+ close combat attack. Unlike the other daemons they are only sporting a 5+ armour save, which matches up with their firefight position.

 

When it comes to how these Lesser Daemons interact with the rest of the list, I have to confess that I have a clear favourite – Flamers. If we think about what the Lost and the Damned list has in abundance, it is the ability to get a whole host of good quality close combat attacks on a variety of different stands. What it lacks, and what Tzeentch daemons excel at, are good firefight abilities. This, for me, means that if you are looking to build a competitive Lost and the Damned list and are not constrained by your Daemon Engine choices, you are much better off playing a Tzeentch themed force than any other as the Lesser Daemons plug a severe deficiency in the list. This is only compounded by the way in which EPIC favours firefight over assault.

Each of the other Gods does have a place however – for example a mechanised coven can make good use of Khorne daemons (especially Flesh Hounds) to allow it to remain a threat after an engagement or two, while a Coven left back for defence might be best marked to Nurgle to allow it to soak hits on the 3+ armour save of the Plaguebearers. Given how many Daemons can be summoned at a time by a fully tricked out Coven, each type can perform very well.

 

And onto the Greater Daemons:

Bloodthirster:

Bloodthirster

Bloodthirster

Quite a simple beast really – point the Bloodthirster at a target you want to die and let it loose. It has three 3+ Titan Killer attacks, three 3+ normal attacks, and a Jump Pack 30cm move. This gives it great killing power and excellent speed, although a single firefight engagement can spell its doom as it lacks a firefight value. It does have the speed to keep up with a mechanised Coven, which is an excellent formation to match it up with, as it will provide the Coven with more killing power on the engage.

Keeper of Secrets:

The Keeper of Secrets has always puzzled me as a formation – it is obviously meant as mostly a close combat beast, but lacks the speed to make it viable when compared to the Bloodthirster. Being able to only move 15cm means that it will struggle to reach base-to-base contact. Although it also has a 30cm range, three shot, MW 4+ ranged weapon, given it will often be doubling in order to get in range this means it will only be hitting on a 5+. When compared to the Lord of Change this firepower is lacking, leaving the Keeper of Secrets as an under-par option.

Great Unclean One:

Great Unclean One

Great Unclean One

The Great Unclean One is another relatively poor choice, given the investment that has to be made in order to summon one reliably. While it is DC4, compared to the other Greater Daemons’ DC3, the GUO still only has the same 4+ Reinforced Armour as the other Greater Daemons. Even with this slight added robustness, the GUO does not shine when it comes to the engagement, either in CC or FF averaging only 2 normal hits in each. The best use I can see for the GUO is to enable a formation to soak up the first four hits on its armour – but this can be done relatively easily with other units for far fewer points.

Lord of Change:

Badly painted Lord of Change

Badly painted Lord of Change

The Lord of Change is an interesting choice, being a 30cm move, Jump Pack, DC3 model with a focus on firefight (three regular 3+ attacks, one 3+ MW attack) and a decent ranged weapon (45cm, 2xMW3+). It does suffer from having to be attached to a Coven in the Lost and the Damned list (something the Daemon World list changes) as that will restrict its movement unless mechanised, but it does provide the Coven with a serious upgrade in firepower, durability, and fire fight ability.

 

Although generally I am not a massive fan of Greater Daemons in the Lost and the Damned list as they cost alot to summon reliably and do not tend to match up well with the Stigmatus Covens they are tied to. While the Lord of Change and the Bloodthirster have the speed to make their abilities tell, being stuck either with a mechanised or foot Coven can make them tricky to use well. Overall I tend to prefer to summon an equivalent number of Lesser Daemons rather than plumping for a Greater Daemon – not only do they have more hits, but they also tend to throw out more attacks.

Hopefully this post clears up a little why I am a) so in favour of Daemons generally and b) so in favour of Tzeentch in particular!

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Traitor Guard Support

Note the Leman Russ in the background

Note the Leman Russ in the background

Originally, I had set out to make my Lost and the Damned army as one heavily based on the Traitor guard units available to the list. While it is still quite heavily guard-orientated, it has morphed into a more rounded force.

The Lost and the Damned list can represent the full gamut of Chaos forces – from the Deamon riddled forces of Daemon Worlds to the recently turned forces like those at Vraks. As part of this, for each Stigmatus Coven selected, the list can take a Traitor Guard formation – either an Armoured Company, an Artillery Battery, Rough Riders or Sentinels. I want to look at each of these formations in turn and then have a look at the way they function in the list as a whole.

2 Armoured Company formations

2 Armoured Company formations

Armoured Company: For 400pts, the Armoured Company is a formation of six Leman Russ tanks (the normal kind, no variants for traitors). The stats have already been covered here, as have the various uses for the Leman Russ upgrade to regular covens. In this formation the situation is somewhat changed – the entire formation is made up of 4+ Reinforced Armour models, making it remarkably resilient. In comparison to the Imperial Guard Tank Company formation, the LatD formation is both smaller and cheaper (in practice each tank ends up costing about 66pts each). This is a double edged sword – easier to break, less firepower, lack of a Vanquisher, balanced out by more formations, less likely to be your Break Their Spirit, and the ability to spread your firepower better. Within the context of the list, the Armoured Company provides a relatively fast and resilient formation that can effectively project decent AT/AP firepower at 75cm. I normally take at least one, sometimes two, in a 3000pts list as it gives the infantry focused Covens some armoured support while nicely complimenting their lack of long range weaponry.

I use Forgeworld's Medusas as my Traitor Artillery Battery

I use Forgeworld’s Medusas as my Traitor Artillery Battery

Artillery Battery: The Artillery Battery in the Lost and the Damned list bears a superficial similarity to those in the regular Imperial Guard list being made up of Basilisks with the same stats with their normal upsides and downsides. Perhaps the most important difference is that while the loyalists arrange their artillery support into batteries of three guns, the traitor batteries have four guns in each. Because of the way that the Barrage table works, 4 BP gives an extra template – doubling the potential for hits. This makes the traitor battery much better than the loyalist one, although this does come at an increased cost. In the context of the list, the Artillery Batteries function as long ranged support – forcing the enemy to spread out therefore making them more susceptible to assaults by your Covens, providing long range AT firepower, or possibly stalling assaults by putting them on overwatch. I always take at least one battery in my Lost and the Damned lists, sometimes two, when I am not taking a second Armoured Company.

My Revenant killing Rough Riders

My Revenant killing Rough Riders

Rough Riders: These have to be the single most useful formation in the entire list. Combining First Strike, long charge ranges, Scouts, good CC potential and speed, Rough Rider have proven to be among the most loved (by me) and hated (by Ben from Forgot My Tea) formations in the entire list. For 150pts, you get six stands of Rough Riders (same stats as in the regular Imperial Guard) although they have no access to a Commissar which is a bit of a blow. Still they are just about the only place in the list in which to get Scout, which allows them to act as screens for your artillery or for your big Coven formations, while the combo of First Strike and decent CC values mean they are a threat to most things. I often use them as fairly sacrificial formations – launch them at something that is likely to kill them, but that they can do a couple of points of damage to first – targeting things that would normally cause the Lost and the Damned list fits like Revenant or Warhound Titans.

I really like the Sentinel models, I just find them lacking in the LatD list

I really like the Sentinel models, I just find them lacking in the LatD list

Sentinels: At 100pts for four, the Sentinel formation is the cheapest available in the list (remember what I said here about the 1:1 Coven to Support ratio and formation prices), and maps exactly onto the regular loyalist formation. Sentinels unfortunately pale in comparison to Rough Riders (maybe I am biased…) being less resilient, fewer in number, less capable in CC, lacking First Strike. All of these do not really make up for the 50pt saving, but Sentinels do shine in filling up the last 100pts in a list, or acting as a cheaper screen for some static artillery. Still, if you want a formation that can actually do something, I would avoid them.

Overall, the Traitor Guard formations provide the Lost and the Damned list with a lot of the ‘essentials’ when it comes to list building. By this, I mean things like Scout screens, long range firepower, and BP template weapons. This is one of the things that gets talked / bitched about quite a lot with the list when it comes to development, but isn’t something I really have an issue with.

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Lost and the Damned Tactica – Hellfire Cannons

Now I have actually bought a 40k army (or two... or three...), I can longer whinge incessantly about its clunky mechanics, unbalanced ruleset, and dodgy models. Still, the thing above really takes the biscuit...

Now I have actually bought a 40k army (or two… or three…), I can longer whinge incessantly about its clunky mechanics, unbalanced ruleset, and dodgy models.
Still, the thing above really takes the biscuit…

Hellfire Cannons in the Lost and the Damned list are a strange beast – originally stemming from the Cannons of Khorne daemon engines they are now an Undivided artillery piece. At 200pts for a formation of four they are quite cheap and, were it not for the 1:1 Coven to Support ration, would be quite easily spammable. They come with a fairly resilient 4+ armour save and an Invulnerable save, meaning they can take a few hits without worrying too much, while their 15cm move allows them to garrison – something I continually forget to do!

The main weapon is a 75cm range, 4+ Macro-weapon, which makes it a fairly long range and hard hitting unit. Both of these things (ranges over 30cm and Macro-weapon) are in pretty short supply in the Lost and the Damned list, so the Hellfires fill a gap in the list well. Given there are four stands in the formation you are looking at 2 hits, and probably 2 kills, meaning three blast markers on any unit within 75cm which is pretty good. They also have a 4+ FF value which is decent.

 

My Hellfire Cannons, made from Squat Thudd Guns and Chaos Squats

My Hellfire Cannons, made from Squat Thudd Guns and Chaos Squats

 

I like to garrison the Hellfires quite far forward to make the best use of their range, while trying to get them placed in area terrain for the -1 to hit. It is unlikely they will move during the game if they can cover a fire-lane so I am less worried about dangerous terrain tests (Hellfires are armoured vehicles). Having a formation or two spread across your front line, near objectives, and in cover can help to stall any of your opponents armoured formations – especially things like Predators or Eldar Grav-tanks that lack Reinforced Armour. Hellfires can also help the Lost and the Damned with the smaller, speedier, titans like Warhounds and Revenants – putting a couple of hits / downed shields / points of damage on them.

In a list taking Hellfires is hampered by the 1:1 ration mentioned above – if I am having to spend 200+ points on a Stigmatus Coven to unlock a support choice, then I tend to want to take a hefty support choice like an Armoured Company or Artillery Battery. I tend to either take the Hellfires in the place of an Artillery Battery (though I do think the Basilisks, although more expensive, are better), or because points are tight. At only 200pts, they represent quite a threat to lightly armoured vehicles, and do it at a range that is not common to the list. Once I had one Artillery Battery in a list, the choice between Hellfires and a second Battery would be a close one.

 

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